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Allen County Health Dept. sees COVID-19 spike, asks public to remain vigilant

Parkview data graph
7-day average comparison

ALLEN COUNTY, Ind. (Fort Wayne’s NBC) — The Allen County Department of Health and local health officials are reminding folks to continue coronavirus precautions as the county is seeing a steady increase in COVID-19 cases.

The department has continued to report increases in positive cases of COVID-19 in the community since March.

Since Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb announced the reopening of the state in early May, Allen County has seen continued increases in COVID-19 cases.

A comparison of two different two-week time periods – one toward the end of the strictest stay-at-home order guidelines (April 19 to May 2) and the other when Indiana started relaxing the order (May 18 to May 31) – found a nearly 54 percent increase in the average seven-day running total of cases, from 157 cases-per-period up to 241 cases-per-period.

An increase in cases is something that health officials expected and warned the public about.

RELATED: Coronavirus outbreak after protests predicted by local health commissioner

Both local hospital systems have also seen an increase in hospitalizations of COVID-19 patients since mid-May. And leaders from both echoed the important role the public plays in ensuring their facilities are able to serve the community with the highest level of care through the pandemic. 

"This virus is still present in the community and affecting many vulnerable populations,” said Dr. Deborah McMahan, Allen County health commissioner.

“Please continue to use recommended precautions. Because many people can carry the virus without having any symptoms, these efforts are not just to protect yourself but everyone you come in contact with.” 

Allen County reported 62 new cases of COVID-19 and no additional deaths from the virus Friday.

The county reports a current total of 1,797 cases and 77 deaths overall.

The State Department of Health is expected to release statewide COVID-19 data at noon.

Here are some tips from the CDC to keep you and your family safe:

1) Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60 percent alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

2) Avoid close contact

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, even inside your home. If possible, maintain six feet between the person who is sick and other household members.
  • Put distance between yourself and other people outside of your home.
  • Remember some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.
  • Stay at least six feet (about two arms’ length) from other people.
  • Do not gather in groups.
  • Stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings.
  • Keeping distance from others is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick (get more details here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-at-higher-risk.html).
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others
  • Since people can spread COVID-19 to others even if they do not feel sick, everyone should wear a cloth face cover in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities. The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people.
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Continue to keep about six feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

3) Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

  • Since people can spread COVID-19 to others even if they do not feel sick, everyone should wear a cloth face cover in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities. The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people.
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Continue to keep about six feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

Coronavirus resources

  • Click here for the latest CDC novel coronavirus resources and links
  • Track the COVID-19 globally using this map tracker here
  • You can view the latest Indiana COVID-19 numbers here
  • Track Ohio's coronavirus numbers here
  • You can catch up on the latest Fort Wayne's NBC coronavirus coverage here
  • Sign up here for the latest local, state and national news regarding COVID-19
  • Click here to sign up for Fort Wayne's NBC News and Weather Alerts

Kayla Crandall

Kayla Crandall is an Emmy award-winning journalist. She serves as the Social Media and Digital Content Manager at WPTA. Follow her on Twitter @KaylerJayne.

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